New releases, Sitecore

Looking forward to Sitecore in 2010


2009 has brought some really nice features and enhancement to Sitecore and has in my point of view really moved Sitecore succesfully to the Enterprise segment. 2009 has also been a year with great focus on feature richness and business value in the product, e.g. by targeting marketing divisions even more. From a developer point of view, 2009 has been a more meager year, although OMS and the rules engine are interesting additions. Below, I have compiled a list of topics, where I would love Sitecore to make headway in 2010. The list is nowhere near complete and is as always my personal opinion. Sadly I have no crystal ball to tell me what Sitecore really focused on.

The maturing OMS

The Online Marketing Suite is a great addition to Sitecore, and has some very cool features and a lot of potential for enhancing all of our solutions in the future. The product has some shortcomings and parts which could need enhancing, though. From a developer point of view, the documentation is limited, and there is no API for extracting data in a summarized or aggregated way – which leaves us to extract data directly from the SQL database using LINQ, SQL or stored procedures. But from my point of view, the most urgent need is best practices and tools for hosting the system. Switching the Analytics.Enabled to true in an out-of-the-box OMS will quickly generate a fairly large (huge) database, and sets some requirements on the hosting servers. Therefore, tools for administrators to handle databases (monitoring, truncating, etc.) as well as documentation for our hosting partners is looked forward to. There is a lot of focus from Sitecore and the community’s side on OMS, so I am confident that the already great product will make quantum leaps in 2010.

Scalable editor environment

One of the most anticipated enhancements of Sitecore has been the possibility to scale the backend/master server. This will allow not only better performance and active failover in the editor environment, but scaling of solutions running directly on the master database without publishing. An example of this type of solution is the Sitecore Intranet Portal. We have had customers requesting this possibility since version 4, and Sitecore codename “Twin Peaks” which introduced this feature, was on the Sitecore 2009 roadmap. Maybe 2010 will be the lucky year.

Enhanced presentation content

With Sitecore 6, the concept of a Page Designer was introduced. This makes it possible for editors or administrators to visually add or rearrange content on a page as well as edit properties on layout elements in a structured manner via property pages – cool features and great selling points. The problem with these features is that it touches upon one of the cornerstones of the Sitecore CMS architecture: The separation of content and presentation. By allowing property pages which saves content on the presentation layer, and allowing editors to change and save layouts directly on individual items, Sitecore has introduced a feature which makes it vital for developers to draw an exact line between content and presentation, and potentially pushes an rather large support burden on to the partners. We look forward to Sitecore best practices and tools to help us with this.

Greater testability

The close relationship between Sitecore and .NET has made it possible to transfer a lot of knowledge, methodology and design principles between the two platforms. Time has shown that not only Sitecore has adopted new.NET patterns, but also that .NET has implemented some of Sitecores (Just think of ASP.NET master pages in .NET 2). One of the great problems with both traditional ASP.NET and Sitecore is the support for unit testing and mocking. .NET has introduced ASP.NET MVC – which in many ways aligns with the content/presentation paradigm in Sitecore – and with this, enhancing support for unit testing. I’m sure many Sitecore developers look forward to a similar push from Sitecore in 2010.

Dreamcore conference

2010 has already introduced the Dreamcore conference – a three day conference hosted by Sitecore North America with developer and business tracks. Arranging this kind of conference on a regional basis, is not only a testimony to the success of Sitecore but fills a growing need in the community for Sitecore to communicate best practices and examples. Especially the developer part of the conference has been desired for some years, and rumors say that a similar conference is under way on our side of the pond. Now let us just hope that the conference brings real world examples and industry best practices instead of more Sitecore sales pitches. 2010 will tell.

No matter what 2010 brings, I am confident it will give us a lot of new cool Sitecore stuff.

Standard

2 thoughts on “Looking forward to Sitecore in 2010

  1. We used the page designer in new projects. It is great to see the flexibility, but.. It is hard to explain to customers and our engineers don’t feel comfortable with the idea that customers can change presentation. Where do you think the line between content and presentation should be?

  2. Eldblom says:

    In my view, its not a matter of drawing the line between content editing and presentation editing. The editors should always move in the realm of content editing, the presentation should merely adapt to the content.
    Example: When the editor wants to create a related text box on the right-hand side of the page (e.g. a read more box), the editor selects the page item in the content editor, selects “New ‘Text box'”, enters the text in the new item, saves and publishes. The presentation layer now adapts to the new content and shows the text box in the right hand side.
    There are other ways of doing the same thing, but the concept is the same: Keep the editor working wth content and adapt the presentation accordingly.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s